University Communications

Remembrance honors alumnus, soldier

November 29, 2012 | Sarah Harlan
Sarah Harlan
Assistant Director of Alumni and Volunteer Services Alumni and Volunteer Services 812-465-1215
Article Photo
From L to R: Sherry B. Darrell, professor emerita of English; Major Christopher Dalrymple, USI ROTC; Sonya Boyer, Endsley's mother; Lisa Porter, Endsley's sister; Rachel Huddleston, Endsley's niece; and David Bower, president of the USI Foundation.
Photo Credit: USI Photography Services

A ceremony to honor Brent Endsley, a USI alumnus who died August 23, was held Tuesday in the ROTC Office. The remembrance was made possible by a contribution to ROTC in Endsley’s honor from Dr. Sherry Darrell, USI professor emerita of English.

Endsley graduated with a Master of Arts degree in Liberal Studies in 2009 and a Bachelor of Arts degree in History and English in 1992.

He served 22 years in the U.S. Army and, later, the Special Forces units of the Kentucky National Guard. Early on, he belonged to the elite 75th Ranger Regiment, 3rd Ranger Battalion’s sniper teams.

Later he rose to become Command Sergeant Major of the 7th troop command, higher headquarters of 20th Special Forces Group Airborne in the Kentucky National Guard. He served world-wide, and his unit was one of the first to conduct special ops on the ground in Afghanistan after the 9/11 attacks. At his death, Endsley worked as global-network director for Mead Johnson Nutritionals.

“We will remember Brent for his sharp intelligence and eagerness to learn, his ease with others and compassionate leadership, his high standards and self-discipline, his generosity and absolute integrity,” Darrell said.

A portrait of Endsley, along with his biography and a description of his awards, will hang in the ROTC Office.

Below the portrait, Major Chris Dalrymple, commanding officer and assistant professor of military science for USI ROTC, plans a memorial to all fallen soldiers. On a small round table will be a white tablecloth, a service cap, a saucer with a slice of lemon and salt on it, and a yellow ribbon.

The white tablecloth symbolizes the purity of the soldiers' intention to serve. The lemon represents their bitter fate, and the salt signifies the tears of their loved ones, according to information provided by Dalrymple.


Endsley’s mother, Sonya Boyer, and his sister, Lisa Porter, attended the ceremony.

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